"We should not be ashamed to discuss what God was not ashamed to create"

-Dr. Howard Hendricks

what a profound statement!
this was one of the many note-worthy message i received in my sexuality, intimacy, and gender class thursday night at huntington university.
i am currently working on a masters in counseling there and have 33 of 60 credits completed (working on an additional 9 this semester)!
i know this class will change my self, self-esteem, marriage, ideas of motherhood, and life in general!

we began with some Scripture readings to learn how to focus on what God says to us in His Word about sexuality:
Phillipians 2:1-11
– the first principle in healthy relationships is humility
1 Peter 1:13-16
– the second principle in healthy relationships is holiness
Ephesians 5:1-20
– have courage and faith to be the person that others can sit with; so they can bring to light all of this junk and sin in their lives
1 Thessalonians 4:1-8
– God’s will is that we be sanctified to have nothing to do with sexual immorality
Matthew 22:36-40
– love God with our sexuality
John 15:1-17
– If He’s the vine and I’m the branch – what does that mean for my sexuality?

i hope in this mini lesson you were able to gain insight, peace, understanding, or at least interest into this topic of learning God’s will for our lives and our sexuality

i want to challenge myself and all of you if you’re willing to accept the challenge, to “not be ashamed to discuss what God was not ashamed to create”

Advertisements

3 responses to “"We should not be ashamed to discuss what God was not ashamed to create"

  1. Hey Rachel! Great talking with you Wed night. Your post reminded me of this great cd Art and I listened to. Have you heard of Tommy Nelson? He did/does a 'teaching' on Song of Solomon that is really good. If interested just look at youtube and put in Tommy Nelson Song of Solomon.

  2. Good thoughts, Rachel.

  3. I've been reading parts of Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" with my AP kids lately. If you can get a translation of it, try perusing the "Wife of Bath's" prologue and tale. Interesting connection to your post, albeit middle ages-era feminist humor.

What do you think?

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s